Cordeauxia edulis

Invasive species Disclaimer

In view of the fact that some tree species are invasive, the world Agroforestry Center (ICRAF) has put in place a policy document on Invasive Alien Species, currently under draft available at Here.

For more information on this subject, please refer to
100 of the World's worst Invasive and Alien Species.




Species Index    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Multiple Criteria Search


Abelmoschus moschatus
Acacia aneura
Acacia angustissima
Acacia aulacocarpa
Acacia auriculiformis
Acacia catechu
Acacia cincinnata
Acacia crassicarpa
Acacia elatior
Acacia erioloba
Acacia etbaica
Acacia ferruginea
Acacia glauca
Acacia holosericea
Acacia karroo*
Acacia koa
Acacia laeta
Acacia lahai
Acacia leptocarpa
Acacia leucophloea
Acacia mangium
Acacia mearnsii*
Acacia melanoxylon
Acacia mellifera
Acacia nilotica subsp nilotica
Acacia pachycarpa
Acacia pennatula
Acacia polyacantha ssp. polyacantha
Acacia saligna
Acacia senegal
Acacia seyal
Acacia sieberiana
Acacia tortilis
Acacia xanthophloea
Acrocarpus fraxinifolius
Adansonia digitata
Adenanthera pavonina
Aegle marmelos
Afzelia africana
Afzelia quanzensis
Agathis macrophylla
Agathis philippinensis
Ailanthus altissima
Ailanthus excelsa
Ailanthus triphysa
Albizia adianthifolia
Albizia amara
Albizia anthelmintica
Albizia chinensis
Albizia coriaria
Albizia ferruginea
Albizia gummifera
Albizia julibrissin
Albizia lebbeck
Albizia odoratissima
Albizia procera
Albizia saman
Albizia versicolor
Albizia zygia
Aleurites moluccana
Allanblackia floribunda
Allanblackia stuhlmannii
Allanblackia ulugurensis
Alnus acuminata
Alnus cordata
Alnus japonica
Alnus nepalensis
Alnus rubra
Alphitonia zizyphoides
Alstonia boonei
Alstonia congensis
Alstonia scholaris
Altingia excelsa
Anacardium occidentale
Andira inermis
Annona cherimola
Annona muricata
Annona reticulata
Annona senegalensis
Annona squamosa
Anogeissus latifolia
Anthocephalus cadamba
Antiaris toxicaria
Antidesma bunius
Araucaria bidwillii
Araucaria cunninghamii
Arbutus unedo
Areca catechu
Arenga pinnata
Argania spinosa
Artemisia annua
Artocarpus altilis
Artocarpus camansi
Artocarpus heterophyllus
Artocarpus integer
Artocarpus lakoocha
Artocarpus mariannensis
Asimina triloba
Ateleia herbert-smithii
Aucomea klaineana
Averrhoa bilimbi
Averrhoa carambola
Azadirachta excelsa
Azadirachta indica
Azanza garckeana
Related Links

Local names:
Amharic (yicib), English (yeheb nut), Somali (yeheb-nut), Trade name (yeheb-nut)

Cordeauxia edulis is an evergreen, multistemmed shrub up to 4 m high. A taproot system up to 3 m deep with small secondary rhizomes near the surface and nodules on younger roots.

Leaves pinnate; leaflets ovate to oblong-ovate; leathery, with red glands on the lower surface.

Flowers yellow.

Pods each contain 1-4 round or ovoid seeds, mistakenly called nuts, 2.0-3.5 cm long.

The specific name, ‘edulis’, means edible.

Ecology

The terrain preferred is a gently undulating ground, never in alluvial flats where water and silt collect. It is found in the Haud-type mixed bush (synonymous to the Somalia-Masai Acacia-Commiphora deciduous bushland and thicket), which unites different bush types growing in the Haud. C. edulis patches are 1 expression of this plant community. The C. edulis sites are often covered with open grass (e.g. Aristida kelleri) and scattered but dense clumps of dominant C. edulis bushes and shrub species, mainly of Acacia and Commiphora, besides Cordia spp., Cordyla somalensis and Grewia spp. Intermingled are taller trees: Acacia tortilis, Albizia anthelminthica and Delonix elata.

Native range
Ethiopia, Somalia

The orthodox seed storage behaviour is questionable; viability is completely lost after a few months of open storage at room temperature. Even under the best conditions, seeds remain viable for only a few months.

The terrain preferred is a gently undulating ground, never in alluvial flats where water and silt collect. It is found in the Haud-type mixed bush (synonymous to the Somalia-Masai Acacia-Commiphora deciduous bushland and thicket), which unites different bush types growing in the Haud. C. edulis patches are 1 expression of this plant community. The C. edulis sites are often covered with open grass (e.g. Aristida kelleri) and scattered but dense clumps of dominant C. edulis bushes and shrub species, mainly of Acacia and Commiphora, besides Cordia spp., Cordyla somalensis and Grewia spp. Intermingled are taller trees: Acacia tortilis, Albizia anthelminthica and Delonix elata.

C. edulis seeds itself well but grows slowly, especially in the seedling stage while it is establishing its massive root system. Up to 80% germination can be obtained.

Poison:  Freshly picked seeds are roasted or boiled and used to kill insects.

  The seeds are edible. The carbohydrate and protein content of the seeds is lower than in pulses and other legumes, but they are richer in sugars and fats, hence providing a balanced diet and high energy. The seed are eaten fresh, dried, roasted or boiled; they have a smooth consistency and an agreeable taste like cashew nut or chestnut. C. edulis is such a hardy species that during drought it is sometimes the only food left for the nomads; thus the plant can provide a valuable food for hot, dry regions, especially with low, uncertain rainfall.

During the dry season, due to its evergreen nature, it is one of the few palatable fodder species available and provides abundant fodder. At that time, it is the mainstay of livestock, especially camels and goats. It, however, cannot withstand long-term heavy browsing pressure. Herdsmen say that it gives a taste to the meat of livestock that have browsed it. In the rainy season, it is avoided by camels, goats, sheep and cattle because the plants have hard leathery leaves that are high in tannins.

Villagers and nomads use the hard wood for firewood. It burns well, even when still wet.

Tannin or dyestuff:  Leaves contain a brilliant red dye, cordeauxiaquinone, that stains the hands and is used in dyeing of fabrics. Cordeauxiaquinone also forms coloured insoluble combinations with many metals.

Medicine:  Cordeauxiaquinone is used medicinally to stimulate hemopoensis.